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Peter Crosby

The lazy person’s guide to enterprise social networking.

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Do you hate reading long-winded blog posts or information-dense data sheets just to find out if something is right for you?

Want something with pretty pictures and bright colors instead? Then, have we got the thing for you!

We call it an “info-graphic”…because it’s part information and part graphic. (Clever, right?)

This “info-graphic” shows you all the highlights of Forrester’s recent study on the ROI of Enterprise Social Networking, and it’s everything you need to know about creating a 21st Century workspace for your employees.

So save yourself the time and trouble of reading Forrester’s 22-page, text-filled report and just skim the easy-to-understand “info-graphic” presented below instead. (Click on it to see it full-size!)

Peter Crosby

How email really kills employee productivity (and it’s not how you think).

Email kills productivity
Everybody hates email; employees, management, and even IT departments all despise email with good reasons. It’s unreliable, unmanageable, and unending.

Email collaboration is counter-productive.

People waste a lot of valuable time writing emails, responding to them, and getting people to stop hitting “Reply All.” In fact, Andrew Killick of Modeuro Consulting thinks 40% of an employee’s time is wasted dealing with internal emails that have no business value.

Frankly, email is rarely the right tool for the job: “Eighty percent of email traffic is waste,” says Killick, and that most companies could realize 5%-30% more productivity by cutting back on email.

But email erodes productivity more than managers think, in ways that are less obvious and, ultimately, even more damaging.

Email doesn’t just kill productivity in the present.

In addition to wasting the time of current employees, email “silos” knowledge away in email clients and on servers where future employees can’t find, access, or use it. You’ve probably got tons of valuable knowledge, files, and other information locked away in your email client and so does each of your colleagues — your email server is a veritable graveyard of sunk costs and company knowledge.

Email isn’t going away anytime soon, so tibbr integrates with email, too. (continued…)
Leandro Perez

New Forrester Research: Speeding Up Employee On-Boarding & Training [Part 5 of 5]

tibbr-blog-forester-report
In September 2013, we commissioned Forrester Consulting to conduct a Total Economic Impact™ study of tibbr. Over the course of six months, the Project Director, Adrienne Breslin, thoroughly examined the potential ROI an enterprise could realize by deploying tibbr. This is Part 5 of a 5-part blog series presenting a summary of her findings.

New hires are the future of every company.

The faster new employees learn a company’s ways, systems, and best practices, the faster they’ll start contributing to the bottom line. So, as a leading enterprise social network, tibbr was designed to make employee on-boarding and training as quick and informative as possible.

To support that claim, TIBCO asked the analyst firm, Forrester Consulting, to determine what impact tibbr had on a company’s training and on-boarding as a part of a larger investigation.

After a thorough financial analysis and numerous interviews with tibbr clients, Forrester put together their Total Economic Impact™ framework identifying five major benefits of deploying tibbr. The first benefit was increased productivity, the second was innovation savings, the third was improved work processes, the fourth was reduced communication costs, and here’s the fifth:

{ Benefit No. 5 } tibbr sped up on-boarding and training. (continued…)

Leandro Perez

New Forrester Research: Reducing internal communication costs [Part 4 of 5]

tibbr-blog-forester-report
In September 2013, TIBCO commissioned Forrester Consulting to conduct a Total Economic Impact™ study of tibbr. Over the course of six months, the Project Director, Adrienne Breslin, thoroughly examined the potential ROI an enterprise could realize by deploying tibbr. This is Part 4 of a 5-part blog seriespresenting a summary of her findings.

Get your message across more effectively.

To make sure employees are all on the same page, businesses need the ability to broadcast important messages company-wide — and, more importantly, get those messages seen and read. Yet many companies still use notoriously unreliable (and ignorable) systems like email. Or worse, expensive and environmentally-unfriendly printed documents.

  • Internal Comms messages
  • HR policy updates
  • IT alerts & warnings
  • Company newsletters
  • General announcements

By comparison, the tibbr platform gives companies the ability to communicate important messages in a way that employees won’t easily miss. But how much better is tibbr than those existing, entrenched systems? That’s one of the things TIBCO asked Forrester Consulting to look into.

After a thorough financial analysis and numerous interviews with tibbr clients, Forrester put together their Total Economic Impact™ framework identifying five major benefits of deploying tibbr. The first was increased productivity, the second was innovation savings, the third was improved work processes, and here’s the fourth:

{ Benefit No. (continued…)

Leandro Perez

New Forrester Research: Improving work processes [Part 3 of 5]

tibbr-blog-forester-report
In September 2013, we commissioned Forrester Consulting to conduct a Total Economic Impact™ study of tibbr. Over the course of six months, the Project Director, Adrienne Breslin, thoroughly examined the potential ROI an enterprise could realize by deploying tibbr. This is Part 3 of a 5-part blog seriespresenting a summary of her findings.

Don’t work more, work better.

Sooner or later, most businesses end up with inefficient processes for handling expense reporting, performance reviews, staff training, records keeping, support tickets, and other common tasks. Worse, sometimes employees in different departments, groups, or offices end up using entirely different processes to accomplish the exact same tasks.

As a leading communication and collaboration platform, tibbr was designed to help people identify and eliminate that kind of inefficiency and productivity-sapping duplication. But does tibbr succeed? Recently, TIBCO asked Forrester Consulting to find out.

After a thorough financial analysis and numerous interviews with tibbr clients, Forrester put together their Total Economic Impact™ framework identifying five major benefits of deploying tibbr. The first was increased productivity, the second was innovation savings, and here’s the third:

{ Benefit No. 3 } tibbr doubled the number of improved business processes.

Over three years, companies who deployed tibbr doubled the number of business processes they improved — including both internal and external processes. (continued…)

Leandro Perez

New Forrester Research: Cutting the cost of innovation [Part 2 of 5]

tibbr-blog-forester-report
In September 2013, TIBCO commissioned Forrester Consulting to conduct a Total Economic Impact™ study of tibbr. Over the course of six months, the Project Director, Adrienne Breslin, thoroughly examined the potential ROI an enterprise could realize by deploying tibbr. This is Part 2 of a 5-part blog series presenting a summary of her findings.

Innovation is the life-blood of any business.

In today’s hyper-competitive business climate, companies that don’t innovate don’t survive. But innovation isn’t cheap, and innovation’s nebulous nature makes it understandably hard to quantify and — for products that claim to impact it — hard to justify.

That’s why TIBCO asked Forrester Consulting to include innovation in their Total Economic Impact™ assessment of tibbr. The firm spent six-months doing a financial analysis on the platform and interviewing clients. When it was done, Forrester found five major benefits.

In our first post, we showed how deploying tibbr increased workforce productivity savings by 3X.In this post, we’ll show what effect tibbr has on business innovation and idea management.

{ Benefit No. 2 } tibbr cut the cost of innovation by 30%.

“We recognize that tibbr provides a simpler, low cost model for crowd-sourcing and innovation and it actually does it well…This would not have been possible before tibbr.” — A Global Energy Management Company

The Forrester consultant reported that, in providing a platform for employees to share, manage, and aggregate ideas, tibbr reduced the cost of innovation and idea management by 30%(by year 3). (continued…)

Leandro Perez

New Forrester Research: Increasing workforce productivity [Part 1 of 5]

tibbr-blog-forester-report
In September 2013, we commissioned Forrester Consulting to conduct a Total Economic Impact™ study of tibbr. Over the course of six months, the Project Director, Adrienne Breslin, thoroughly examined the potential ROI an enterprise could realize by deploying tibbr. This is Part 1 of a 5-part blog seriespresenting a summary of her findings.

Workforce productivity is every company’s goal.

There are lots of companies claiming to improve workforce productivity (including tibbr), but talk is cheap. Can we really deliver? That’s what TIBCO asked Forrester Consulting to find out by putting the tibbr platform to the test.

After a thorough financial analysis and numerous interviews with tibbr clients, Forrester put together a Total Economic Impact™ framework that identified tibbr’s ROI in terms of cost, benefit, flexibility, and risk factors.

When it was all said and done, Forrester’s analysis identified five major benefits to companies who deployed tibbr, but let’s start with the first one:

{ Benefit No. 1 } tibbr increased workforce productivity savings by 3X.

“There are cases we are seeing all across tibbr where people are clearly saving time by posting out to a subject or a group of people to get the answers they need, and clearly saving themselves what equates to a lot of time gathering the information they need.” — A Leading Professional Services Company

Forrester reported that tibbr helped employees collaborate better with peers even across functional and geographical boundaries. (continued…)

Peter Crosby

The 3 things you should do to make your company more innovative.


In the recent blog post for the Harvard Business Review, Tim Kastelle wrote about how companies often incorrectly react to business challenges. In his post, “Is Your Innovation Problem Really a Strategy Problem?” Kastelle argues that the problem companies are trying to solve isn’t always the real problem.

Is a lack of innovation your real problem?

When faced with increasing competition or declining sales, businesses frequently assume that innovation is the solution. So they put more energy and resources towards coming up with lots of new ideas.

Yet, according to Kastelle, most large firms are actually strong at generating ideas. Where companies fall down is in selecting the best ideas and implementing them.

So a company’s declining fortunes may, in fact, point to a larger issue. He suggests that the real problem isn’t too little innovation, but rather, a bad business strategy.

Devising a better business strategy.

To find the best business strategy for a company, Kastelle lays out three key points to consider:

  1. Avoid top-down strategy making. Don’t let one group create the strategy and expect another group to implement it — expand the number of people creating the strategy to avoid execution problems.
  2. Involve more people in strategy development.
  3. (continued…)

Peter Crosby

What history can teach you about the future of productivity.

Image of the future of productivity
There was a time when you couldn’t get email on your mobile phone. No, seriously. The Blackberry didn’t exist yet, and advances” in mobile phones consisted of nothing more than “making them flip open like a Star Trek communicator”(Google it if you don’t believe me).

The Dark Ages of Early Mobile.

bigstock-Man-Writes-A-Contract-53969806.smThe mobile phone was first demonstrated in 1973, when its sole function was the horribly garbled transmission of the human voice. (Sadly, it stayed mobile’s sole function for almost thirty more years.)

Not surprisingly, the end of the 20th Century was a dark time in the business world, too (kinda like the Middle Ages only without the bubonic plague). Employee productivity during this barbarous time stagnated because actual work could only be performed at the office or on desktop computers inside people’s homes (and never after dusk which was against English Guild rules).

A Renaissance of Productivity.

usproductivityThe appearance of Blackberry devices at the turn of the 21st Century heralded the dawn of a New Age — business people could finally check their email while out of the office. Not coincidentally, productivity gains soared over the following years (see U.S. Productivity, 2003-2007).

Ubiquitous mobile access to email had removed a huge roadblock to getting work done. (continued…)

Peter Crosby

The Management/Employee divide is increasing; here’s how to close it.


If you’re running a decent sized company, chances are, you’re getting a pretty biased view of what’s actually happening in your company. That’s because hierarchical org-charts often insulate business leaders from the front-line realities.

Do you live in a back-office bubble?

When it comes to company communication, multiple levels of management can introduce “errors” into the system (see “Grapevine” or “Telephone Game”). As a result, management isn’t always getting accurate information about what’s happening on the sales floor, and sales floor employees aren’t getting good instructions for the same reason. This disconnect between Management and Employees is widening into a serious problem for many companies. Communication silos like these severely affect a company’s execution and reduce its productivity.

Is a flat, non-hierarchical structure the answer?

The trendy solution to this problem is “re-orging” the company with a flat, non-hierarchical structure. This approach distributes decision-making responsibility and authority to everyone in your organization. And it depends on having employees who understand the company vision, business complexities, and ramifications of their actions as well as, or better than, you and your management team.

But what if you can’t, or don’t want tore-org your entire company? Or what if, as more and more companies are finding, your employees don’t want a flat structure? (continued…)